Adrienne's Bookish Blog

Reading. It makes the world go around.
The Red Queen (The Cousins' War, #2) - Philippa Gregory Essentially, this is the same story as The White Queen but told from the enemy's perspective. I didn't really like Margaret at first, but I admired how she stuck to her "godly" vision of having her son crowned King of England. This book answered some of the questions I had about the Lancaster's in the background of The White Queen and was a reasonably good read.
Facing the Music and Living to Talk About It - Nick  Carter I feel bad for giving this 2 stars. I wanted to like this book, I admire Nick for opening up about his messy past and encouraging others to fix up their lives. I think it just got very repetitive at times and I think it doesn't stand up as a "great" self-help book, nor a celebrity memoir.
Before I Go To Sleep - S.J.Watson This was such a gripping novel. It sucked me right in and I could not turn the pages fast enough. Not too many books have that effect on me. I don't know why I had this sitting on my shelf for so long. I highly recommend this book!
The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein - Peter Ackroyd An interesting take on Shelley's Frankenstein. As a fan of the original, I probably would not recommend this novel to a fellow fan. If I had tried harder to dissociate the two versions, perhaps my reading experience would have been better and the ending might not have left me feeling so disappointed.
The Shelters of Stone - Jean M. Auel Biggest waste of time. I think I'm giving up the series, even if it is just one more book left. I just can't go through more pointless introductions and repetitive descriptions about Ayla's 'inventions' and "Pleasures" shared with Jondolar. I just can't.
Keepsake - Kristina Riggle I reviewed this book on my youtube channel!http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3im6fOGkizU
Great Tales From English History Omnibus - Robert Lacey If you want to learn more about Engligh history but you don't know where to start, this is the perfect book. It starts at 7000 B.C and ends at 1953, chronicling the most famous English people and their stories. As an English history nut, I really appreciated this book. It was comprehensive yet simple and was a great sampling of other pieces of English history I hadn't yet thought to look for yet aloe found.
Flight - Rosie Dub From the get go I was hooked on this book. The concept of reincarnation and past lives and their repercussions interfering with present ones has always been a concept that I feel isn't explored enough in well written stories these days. I read this book fairly quickly, in two sittings, which shows just how much I couldn't put it down. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes a good supernatural thriller.
Under the Baobab Tree - Jane Chidgey Wow. Never before have I had access to such an honest and emotional story about South Africa and all of its beauty. Granted that there is some ugliness too with crime, corruption and the heartbreak caused by HIV, this book helped me put things in perspective. I think this book is how a memoir should make readers feel - emotionally connected to the characters and places without ever having heard of them before.
Under the Baobab Tree - Jane Chidgey Wow. Never before have I had access to such an honest and emotional story about South Africa and all of its beauty. Granted that there is some ugliness too with crime, corruption and the heartbreak caused by HIV, this book helped me put things in perspective. I think this book is how a memoir should make readers feel - emotionally connected to the characters and places without ever having heard of them before.
The Hunger Games - Suzanne  Collins Wow. I initially thought I wouldn't enjoy reading a book about a bunch of teenagers fighting to the death in an arena, but this book really captivated me. I think I also related so well to Katniss and her need to be self-sufficient that this book felt really personal to me. I can't wait to keep reading this series but a part of me kind of wanted it to just end the way it did... or with a sense of more finality. I have a feeling that perhaps this book wasn't meant to be a trilogy but someone caught on to its marketing appeal. Either way, it's an incredibly engrossing read.
The Rook - Daniel O'Malley Wow. The Rook was not what I had expected. This book is like The Bourne Trilogy (but with a female protagonist) mixed with X-Men and Johnny English. In saying that, this book would make a fun tv show or movie. I loved learning more about the 'old' Myfanwy as the 'new' Myfanwy tried to keep up appearances after her forced amnesia and run a secret intelligence agency full of operatives with weird powers. It was hilarious in parts, scary and disturbing in others and really gripping the whole way through. I would definitely recommend this book.
The Book Thief - Markus Zusak Oh. My. God. This was such a beautiful book. I won't even go into the plot because i'm just going to say READ IT!You MUST READ IT! I loved the way it was narrated by Death and the way he foreshadows what happens to these people, instead of just doing a roll call at the end of the book. This was definitely still emotional without being absolutely depressing. I can't recommend this book highly enough.
Secrets - Freya North Considering I'm not usually a romance reader, I really enjoyed this novel. The lack of planning and direction Freya North uses when writing can be seen with this book, but not in a bad way. Her own structure and lack of foreshadowing makes the reader as emotionally confused as the characters. Sure, there's still some clich├ęs and obvious metaphors that usually permeate most romance novels, but I think it was the flawed characters that really engrossed me. A nice read, I would recommend this to anyone who loves the romance genre.
The End of the World: A Short Story - Stefan Babich This is a very well written, compelling piece of work. I just wish there had been some more answers to the questions that popped up in my mind... who was The Man with the Knife? Why was the world ending? Overall though it was a nice short story to read on a relaxing afternoon.
The End of the World: A Short Story - Stefan Babich This is a very well written, compelling piece of work. I just wish there had been some more answers to the questions that popped up in my mind... who was The Man with the Knife? Why was the world ending? Overall though it was a nice short story to read on a relaxing afternoon.

Currently reading

Crime and Punishment (Penguin Classics)
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, David McDuff
Progress: 160/671 pages
Geekomancy
Michael R. Underwood
Progress: 70 %